Be Near Me, Lord Jesus

S (Scripture): Micah 4:1 But in the days to come,
the mountain of the Lord’s house
will be the highest of the mountains;
it will be lifted above the hills;
peoples will stream to it.
2 Many nations will go and say:
“Come, let’s go up to the mountain of the Lord,
to the house of Jacob’s God,
so that he may teach us his ways
and we may walk in God’s paths!”
Instruction will come from Zion
and the Lord’s word from Jerusalem.
3 God will judge between the nations
and settle disputes of mighty nations,
which are far away.
They will beat their swords into iron plows
and their spears into pruning tools.
Nation will not take up sword against nation;
they will no longer learn how to make war.
4 All will sit underneath their own grapevines,
under their own fig trees.
There will be no one to terrify them;
for the mouth of the Lord of heavenly forces has spoken.

O (Observation): In the times of the prophets, God’s people experienced great turmoil – being taken over by foreign nations, being threatened because of their choice of religion, being enslaved. In these terrible times of upheaval, God’s prophets would not only give a word of correction to God’s people, but also – in some manner – a word of great comfort, too. That comforting word would usually come in the form of some future hope promised by God.

In Micah 4, we have a future hope, one in which weapons are re-purposed as farming instruments…instruments of peace and life.

A (Application): God finds a way to lift up correction and yet mercy, time and time again. In almost the same breath we hear words of correction and yet words of mercy. God is both!

Jesus exudes the same stance of correction and mercy: he tells the man who is brought on a mat that his sins are forgiven (correction), and that he is healed (mercy); he tells the woman at the well that she has several husbands, yet offers her water which will quench her thirst forever; he tells the story of a boy who hit rock bottom, but is also welcomed home by his father.

The story of hope is the story of the Scriptures. Even the challenging texts from Revelation point to Jesus as victor over the hideous beasts this broken world has to offer.

The season of Advent calls us to be a hopeful people. We will be so, but we will need constant reminding. So we gather for worship and with one another for mutual uplifting. We gather in the community to meet people and to serve people.

May this Advent waiting fill you with hope, even if the signs around you point out what you lack.

P (Prayer): Lord, keep us hopeful his season. Just “BE” with us. Amen.

If you’re going through a difficult season of life, we invite you to come and worship with us on Sunday, December 17, 2017, at 3pm, for “The Longest Night” worship service, a worship time of Longing, Hope, and Healing.

Click here for our Facebook event for more details regarding “The Longest Night.”

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